Mission LifeForce: Criminalizing Ecocide

Mission LifeForce is a growing international movement of Earth Protectors based on a legal document, the Earth Protectors Trust Fund document. It is like a crowdfund, a petition and a legal Trust all rolled into one, and it’s extremely powerful. In fact, it’s the missing piece – making climate and ecological justice possible where nothing else has. For more information, click here.

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Gretel Ehrlich Receives 2017Wilderness Writing Award

Ehrlich_Gretel from FBThe 2017 Wilderness Writing Award goes to American Gretel Ehrlich who has had some incredible life experiences, including being struck by lightening, that she wrote about in A Match to the Heart. She has written about her travels and experiences and is passionately supportive of the environment. The Wilderness Writing Award is bestowed every two years to a living writer for a Lifetime Achievement of work that is meaningful and about wild nature, the environment, or the land. The award is co-sponsored by The Wild Foundation, Fulcrum Publishing, and the International League of Conservation Writers.

Ehrlich was born on a horse ranch in California and was educated at Bennington College (Vermont) and the UCLA film school (California). She began writing fulltime in 1978. Annie Dillard who praised Ehrlich’s 1985 book, The Solace of Open, said: “Wyoming has found its Whitman.” Ehrlich has written several other books including Heart Mountain; Islands, the Universe, and Home; Yellowstone: Land of Fire and Ice; John Muir, Nature’s Visionary; In the Empire of Ice: Encounters in a Changing Landscape; and Facing the Wave: A Journey in the Wake of the Tsunami. Ehrlich has also written essays, short stories, and poems. Her work has appeared in Harper’s, the Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Time Magazine, Life, National Geographic Adventure, National Geographic Traveler, Outside, and Audubon, among others.

European Wilderness Society Visits ILCW

Screenshot-2018-2-21 European Wilderness Society meets International League of Conservation Writers
Verena Grubler from the European Wilderness Society (Austria) is shown with Bob Baron and Patty Maher when she stopped by the Colorado (USA) office of the International League of Conservation Writers in mid-February.

Recently, Verena Gruber from the European Wilderness Society, headquartered in Tamsweg, Austria, visited the International League of Conservation Writers at our office in Golden, Colorado. Learning more about each other’s organizations we also discussed how our two organizations can work together on future projects. Gruber is making her way across the U.S. and meeting key people in environmental and conservation positions in the U.S. government, NGOs and private foundations. Her three-month trip will last until March.

Recent Film Festival features ILCW Members

The International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula, Montana recently included films about or by ILCW members. Clay Bolt (ILCW member, USA) was featured in a new short “Clay Bolt” by director Chema Domenech where the conservation photographer talks about photographing bugs and other creatures smaller than your finger. Also, Neil Losen (LCW member, USA) had two films included in the festival that he directed or co-directed: “The Path Back” and “Laws of the Lizard”, winner of Best Broadcast Film that he co-directed with Nate Dappen. For more information click here.

The Clean Water Act and Existing Threats in US Waters

NoWaterNoLife horizBy Isabelle Bienen, NWNL Research Intern
(Edited by Alison M. Jones, NWNL Director)

Part 1 of a 3-part series
The Clean Water Act was created by the U. S. Congress to ensure that those in the U.S. have access to safe drinking water. This blog series will highlight the threats that spurred the creation of this act (citing specific issues in NWNL case-study watersheds); a definition of its regulations; and an analysis of its implementation and implications. Below is the first post in this series which outlines how this Act came to be. It continues to specifically depict existing threats in the Mississippi River Basin (a NWNL case study watershed) that helped shape the Act and those that are addressed in the Act. The second blog in this series will detail existing threats and those addressed by the Act that are in the other 2 NWNL North American case study watersheds: the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia River Basin, and New Jersey’s Raritan River Basin. The third blog will discuss general health threats across the U.S. that also clearly highlighted the need for the Clean Water Act. Read More.