ICCF Warns Crisis in Illegal Wildlife Trafficking

The world’s population is continuing to grow. As we continue to stress our natural systems now, how do we make space and a way for animals to survive in their natural environments while more and more people compete for the same resources? David Barron of the International Conservation Caucus Foundation states in a recent article in Origin magazine that “In the next fifty years, the world population is expected to increase from seven to eleven billion, with three billion more people in Africa alone. If we do not find solutions to this crisis now, there will be little habitat left beyond sparse areas of national parks that will serve as glorified zoos to small pockets of remaining animals.” Click here to read the article.

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Kenya and the US Team Up to Thwart Poaching

At the end of January U.S Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Professor Judi Wakhungu, the Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Environment & Natural Resources, at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy and Northern Rangelands Trust headquarters in Kenya. The MOU represents a pledge by both Kenya and the United States to collaborate on combating the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts, particularly elephant ivory and rhino horn.

Save Mali’s Elephants from Poaching

Poachers are taking a toll on the Elephants of Mali in western Africa. The elephants need your help. For nearly a decade the Mali Elephant Project (a partner project between the WILD Foundation and the International Conservation Fund of Canada) has successfully protected this herd by working with villagers to restore elephant habitat. Now, the project is rapidly adapting this strategy to confront poaching, including training armed rangers (who effectively stop poaching) to patrol the elephant range. However, this is an unexpected cost to the project, and urgently requires the assistance of a broad international movement of people with compassion for elephants. To help and to view more information, please click here.

Green Spaces Improve Health Study Finds

The research is one of the first studies to consider the effects of green space over time and has used data from the British Household Panel Survey, a repository of information gathered from questionnaires filled in by households across Great Britain.
Using data from over 1,000 participants, the research team at the University of Exeter Medical School focused on two groups of people: those who moved to greener urban areas, and those who relocated to less green urban areas.
They found that, on average, movers to greener areas experienced an immediate improvement in mental health that was sustained for at least 3 years after they moved. The study also showed that people relocating to a more built up area suffered a drop in mental health. Interestingly this fall occurred before they moved; returning to normal once the move was complete. Read more.

China to Release 6th Panda Raised in Captivity Into the Wild

By CRIenglish.com
Hua Yan, a two-year-old female, will be the sixth giant panda bred in captivity to be released into the wild after completing a two-year wilderness training program, said Huang Yan, chief engineer of the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Sichuan.
“This will be the first time we have released a giant panda in spring. This is part of a wider program to introduce more captivity-bred pandas into the wild to diversify the gene pool,” said Huang.
Previously, pandas were released in late autumn or early winter, the time when wild young pandas usually leave their mother to live independently.
“The ‘panda-going-into-the-wild’ project is at a very early stage, and we need to send pandas back to nature at different times to work out the best time for release,” said Huang.
“Plus, we believe a female will be more welcomed by wild pandas when they are in heat,” he said.
Hua Yan lives in the wilderness training reserve at Tiantai Mountain in Sichuan, along with another three pandas who are being trained. All the candidates are in good shape despite it being the coldest winter in a decade.
China began releasing captive-bred pandas into the wild in 2006 when Xiang Xiang, a five-year-old male, was released in the Wolong National Nature Reserve. However, Xiang Xiang died roughly a year later after fighting with other pandas over food and territory.
In 2012, 2013 and 2014, Tao Tao (male), Zhang Xiang (female) and Xue Xue (female) were released in Liziping reserve. Xue Xue died in November 2014.
The latest release was Hua Jiao, a two-year-old female, in November 2015.
Researchers have been tracking Hua Jiao, Tao Tao and Zhang Xiang with the help of GPS collars, radio positioning tools and DNA. The monitoring data show the animals are doing well.
Giant pandas are one of the world’s most endangered species. Fewer than 2,000 pandas live in the wild, mostly in the provinces of Sichuan and Shaanxi. There were 375 giant pandas in captivity at the end of 2013, about 200 of them at the CCRCGP.
More information and to view photos

Kenya and the US Team Up to Thwart Poaching
At the end of January U.S Secretary of the Interior, Sally Jewell signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Professor Judi Wakhungu, the Kenyan Cabinet Secretary for Environment & Natural Resources, at the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy and Northern Rangelands Trust headquarters in Kenya. The MOU represents a pledge by both Kenya and the United States to collaborate on combating the illegal trade in wildlife and wildlife parts, particularly elephant ivory and rhino horn.

More info

Sanjay Gubbi Survives Leopard Attack

Gubbi_Sanjay
Sanjay Gubbi

ILCW member Sanjay Gubbi (India), a wildlife biologist who in his position as a wildlife officer, was called in to a school in Bangalore, India to capture a leopard that had gotten onto school grounds. He found the leopard and kept it occupied while keeping others safe. But in the meantime was badly injured by the leopard’s attack. He had several bite marks, broken bones and needed surgery. By keeping calm Sanjay was able to survive. It is truly amazing that he was not killed by the leopard attack. Listen to his fascinating story from the BBC.

Save Mali’s Elephants from Poaching

Poachers are taking a toll on the Elephants of Mali in western Africa. The elephants need your help. For nearly a decade the Mali Elephant Project (a partner project between the WILD Foundation and the International Conservation Fund of Canada) has successfully protected this herd by working with villagers to restore elephant habitat. Now, the project is rapidly adapting this strategy to confront poaching, including training armed rangers (who effectively stop poaching) to patrol the elephant range. However, this is an unexpected cost to the project, and urgently requires the assistance of a broad international movement of people with compassion for elephants. To help and to view more information, please click here.

China to Release 6th Panda Raised in Captivity Into the Wild

By CRIenglish.com

Hua Yan, a two-year-old female, will be the sixth giant panda bred in captivity to be released into the wild after completing a two-year wilderness training program, said Huang Yan, chief engineer of the China Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Sichuan.

“This will be the first time we have released a giant panda in spring. This is part of a wider program to introduce more captivity-bred pandas into the wild to diversify the gene pool,” said Huang.

Previously, pandas were released in late autumn or early winter, the time when wild young pandas usually leave their mother to live independently.

“The ‘panda-going-into-the-wild’ project is at a very early stage, and we need to send pandas back to nature at different times to work out the best time for release,” said Huang.

“Plus, we believe a female will be more welcomed by wild pandas when they are in heat,” he said.

Hua Yan lives in the wilderness training reserve at Tiantai Mountain in Sichuan, along with another three pandas who are being trained. All the candidates are in good shape despite it being the coldest winter in a decade.

China began releasing captive-bred pandas into the wild in 2006 when Xiang Xiang, a five-year-old male, was released in the Wolong National Nature Reserve. However, Xiang Xiang died roughly a year later after fighting with other pandas over food and territory.

In 2012, 2013 and 2014, Tao Tao (male), Zhang Xiang (female) and Xue Xue (female) were released in Liziping reserve. Xue Xue died in November 2014.

The latest release was Hua Jiao, a two-year-old female, in November 2015.

Researchers have been tracking Hua Jiao, Tao Tao and Zhang Xiang with the help of GPS collars, radio positioning tools and DNA. The monitoring data show the animals are doing well.

Giant pandas are one of the world’s most endangered species. Fewer than 2,000 pandas live in the wild, mostly in the provinces of Sichuan and Shaanxi. There were 375 giant pandas in captivity at the end of 2013, about 200 of them at the CCRCGP.

More information and to view photos

Animal Wall Art Made by Special Effects Makeup Artist

Proceeds go to their protection
Wilde Animals is a group that make beautiful wall art OF endangered and vulnerable species to raise awareness that over half of the world’s animal species could become extinct within the next 100 years. Lauren Wilde is a special effects makeup artist and has united this talent with her love for animals. It’s a creative way to start the conversation on saving these species. The Wilde Animals are made from all vegan materials and are mounted on recycled, refurbished plaques and frames. 15% of every sale is donated to an organization actively helping the animal that was purchased.

View art samples and to learn more